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Space | Time

There is much confusion still prevailing concerning the concepts time and space. In the Philosophy Chart you will find under no.7 a description of the opposing theories of Time and under no.23 its possible origin in the evolution of the human being. No.24 discusses the two different kinds of time and space as existing in the mind’s of people but perhaps not otherwise.

In addition to countless other scientists and philosophers, Albert Einstein spent a large part of his intellectual life researching theories of time and space, to find out whether space and ether meant the same thing or not, whether space was bent or not and the relativity of time measurement dependent to observation.

Towards the end of his life Einstein cancelled his earlier concepts concerning time and space and declared that “time is what is measured on clocks and space is what is measured on rulers!”.

This means if we are measuring the duration and dimensions of a dog that there is no such thing as a time and a space in addition to the enduring repetitive event of dog being measured. This is not easy to understand. It took Einstein more than 50 years to reach this view. And we should be grateful to him for spotting it.

Since early human history there has been both a need and a keen interest to measure and record the duration of things and processes. And to measure and record distances and sizes.

Yet some thinkers this past century claimed space and time were recently united! This may be true as a mathematical tool but no person in his right mind would ever claim that something could exist in time outside of space or exist in space outside of time. So in reality time and space have never been separated and cannot be separated. The “when” and the “where” of things and events always goes hand in hand.

Without the measurement of time and space, we would not be able to measure change. So the concepts of time and space are fundamentally tools for measuring change and non-change (repetition).



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Page last modified on Wednesday 11 of June, 2008 [13:18:15 UTC].


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