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Nonrepeat

The Greek Philosopher Heraclytus declared that “a person cannot step twice into the same river”. Perhaps this is true at every level of micro and macro things. Science has not advanced sufficiently to prove this conclusively although quantum theory suggests it.

Yet for all practical purposes in everyday life some things remain sufficiently the same to be recognized and given names.

A gold bar at Fort Knox if undisturbed, would remain virtually the same for thousands, maybe millions of years. It all depends on the supporting conditions favouring the repetition.

In the universe, on this earth, in and around us, some things are more repetitive, some things less repetitive and some do not repeat at all.

Those that do not repeat figure as “once events” in the Main Frameworkexternal link. Once events can be of two kinds. Those that we miss completely and because of their nonrepetition do not spot (see gap). And those that are the beginnings of things we have spotted.

For example: a first romantic date with your partner is a marvellous once event. You then marry and live together for 50 years. It’s not the same thing at all! It becomes a repetitive event.

To the more frequently repeating things and events we give names corresponding to patterns and meanings derived from them in our brains and nervous systems. We use these as tools for making sense out of the world we live in.

A law is a repetitive event. When scientists talk of laws they are pointing to a repetitive event. No more than that. When the repetition has gone, the law has gone. And so have we if certain repetitive supporting conditions within us or outside of us stop repeating. The same applies to the sun and the whole solar system. It’s just a question of degree of repetition.

The ultimate repetitive eventrepeat situation – could be the metathing. This is further discussed under metaphysics, big bang, ether and eternity

See pattern and meaning.

See use and tool.



Last edited by admin .
Page last modified on Wednesday 25 of June, 2008 [10:36:41 UTC].


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